Vern Wuensche Story

IMG_7335 as Smart Object-1_pp375wVern Wuensche was born in the tiny farming community of McDade in central Texas, the third son of a handyman carpenter with a second grade education who worked for Elgin Butler Brick Company. His mother was a farm girl and later a homemaker who was employed at Travis State School working in the laundry.  She completed the eighth grade.

Vern completed McDade Elementary and then graduated from Elgin High School in 1963.   In the fall he entered The University of Texas at Austin obtaining a BBA in accounting in 1967, and an MBA in management in 1968, graduating first in his class.

Following graduation—after a stint with the United States Army Reserve—he worked first as an auditor for Arthur Andersen & Co. and then as a tax consultant for Peat Marwick Mitchell & Co.   Later he was employed with a series of smaller companies first as a cost accountant for a bag manufacturer, then as assistant controller for an oilfield company, and finally as local controller for several national residential homebuilders. He received his CPA certificate in 1975.

Together with his brother he founded his own company Woodmark Homes, Inc. in May of 1975 with $6,000.00, few contacts and little chance to borrow any additional capital.  His company survived, it grew, and it made substantial profits in its third year in 1978.   Following 1979’s downturn he had his first experience with our dysfunctional legal system where he spent four years pursuing a dishonest individual, obtaining a settlement barely equal to cost of his lawyer.  From this experience he gained the knowledge that there was little apparent benefit in pursuing justice or in using the courts to recover funds taken from his company.   This was the beginning of a difficult 30 year struggle to survive his construction business without a functioning legal system.  The true nature of it neither protected him nor his business from continuing and regular outrageous personal and financial assaults.  Where each assault was worse than the previous.

Following the last such assault in 2003 he formed Legal Reform Now! as a part of Texans for Efficiency in Government, Inc., which he had founded in 1990, through it to make transparent the true nature of our nation’s legal system.  So Americans could see for themselves the self-serving nature of a closed system of lawyers and judges many of whom in administering the legal process ignore their responsibility in obtaining justice.

And yet despite the continuing assaults Vern Wuensche’s company Woodmark has had some proud moments.  It has been recognized for building a number of award-winning projects for prominent Houston clients.  To mention one, a 6,000 square foot home built for a nationally prominent individual was one of seven projects in Texas to receive a design award from the Texas Society of Architects.  An unsuccessful competitor on this project later built the home of President George H. W. Bush.

Today the focus of his efforts is Woodmark Kitchen and Bath, Inc., a stable and growing company with a twenty-year history of renovating kitchens and baths in Houston .  Ninety percent of its work comes from referrals or previously satisfied customers.

Vern has had varied experiences and pursuits:

Vern grew up on a farm working for others picking cotton at age eight, hoeing peanuts, and hauling hay—and raising vegetables and his own hogs for sale.

Vern as a pro se non-lawyer handled all aspects of a complicated four-year, three-party case in State District Court ending in a jury trial requested by him.   The case involved land which had been in his family’s possession since the land was deeded to his distant grandfather by Sam Houston.  Through this experience he learned from the inside how poorly lawyers and lawyer-judges operate in failing to deliver justice in our courts.

Vern in 2007 authored a book Overcoming Legal Abuse as an American Entrepreneur where through his thirty-two years of experience with our nation’s legal system as a residential building entrepreneur he illuminated its flaws while providing a large number of creative solutions to fix it.  The book is available on Barnesandnoble.com and Amazon.com.

Vern has been involved as a hands-on manager in building volume homes and custom homes, and renovating homes, plus kitchen and bath remodeling projects.  Over the years he has learned home and kitchen and bath design—and with the exception of having skills in electrical, plumbing, heating and air conditioning—is fully capable of building entire projects himself.

Vern is also a self-taught designer of high ranking web sites, doing the research, writing, design, publishing, and search engine optimization which has generally resulted in first-page position for pertinent major search terms.

Vern was an early marathoner, twice running the distance of Galveston island in the early 1970’s.  He has continued this distance running regularly all his life.

Vern is also a Christian who is serious about his faith.  He has regularly attended Missouri Synod Lutheran churches all his life.  In college he served as treasurer at University Lutheran Church in Austin. After college he served on the finance board at St. Marks Lutheran Church in Houston.   He has been a member of Memorial Lutheran Church in Houston for over forty years, serving as an Elder for twenty of those years.

Vern Wuensche has been active in Texas politics continuously since 1972.   As an eleven-year-old he hung bell-shaped door hangers on doors in McDade, Texas for Eisenhower in 1956.   During the last forty-three years he has worked on campaigns of every type.   He has attended all Republican conventions except one, usually as a state delegate.   With this broad and varied experience he has obtained an in depth understanding of the political process.   And he has been a life-long student of the presidency, with a particular focus on presidential campaigns.

In February, 2007, he filed for the Republican nomination for President of the United States with the goal of showing that someone with an average background—having little money—could do reasonably well against those who were nationally known and had many millions of dollars.   And if things fell well into place for him, maybe much better than reasonably well.

In the 2008 Iowa Caucuses Senator John McCain placed fourth; Wuensche placed tenth.   In the New Hampshire primary John McCain won; Wuensche placed tenth—three places behind Congressman Duncan Hunter who spent $2.5 million plus having a year of national television exposure in the media and the debates. Wuensche defeated Congressman Thomas Tancredo, Senator Sam Brownback, Governor Tommy Thompson, and Governor James Gilmore, all who quit before the Iowa Caucuses.   Tancredo had spent as much as $7,000,000 on the race.  In directly meeting over 6,000 small business owners face to face in 242 towns and cities in Iowa and New Hampshire over a total of 100 days, as a political entrepreneur Wuensche had spent a total of $36,159.

In 2012 with the habits of a small businessman of standing his ground and adapting and moving forward, following his run for President in 2008, he ran again.  But with the 2008 Obama election the economy had tanked and his small business as many others had its revenue cut in half, so cash was tight.  He used frequent flyer miles accumulated over many years and performed the construction labor himself on one job to obtain the last $3,000 necessary to run.  Spending $10,000, among serious candidates he placed seventh in both the Iowa Caucuses and the New Hampshire Primary.  He ended his campaign with $400 remaining with credit cards maxed out and no other sources of cash.   One small construction project which he had set up to start a week later allowed him to begin the road back.  Today despite the President’s sorry record on the economy he has fully recovered and after 39 continuous years in business is Houston’s oldest residential contractor.

The point he believed he successfully made both times is that if enough people of average means and abilities would run for any public office, by the simple law of probability, our nation would almost certainly elect better leaders and fewer lawyers who would have the public’s interest at heart.

America would greatly benefit.

Vern Wuensche has lived in the Memorial area of Houston for forty-six years.